Roller Hockey Defined (Part II)

Roller hockey began in England in the Late 1800s.

Though roller skates were created in 1760 by John Joseph Merlin, the first roller hockey was probably played in England in 1878 at the Denmark Roller Rink in London. Some sources state that “roller skate hockey” was first played in Kent, England. It didn’t any time for roller hockey to catch on and grow. 

By the 1880s, leagues, and rules of play expanded in cities throughout America’s Midwest. The initial games were played on quad skates and the players utilized curved sticks called “canes,” like today’s field hockey sticks. Team play was made up of players attempting to shoot a roller hockey puck or hockey ball into the goal. The team with the highest number of goals won the game.

Roller Hockey’s Future

In 1924, the Roller Sports Federation was created, and its aim was to standardize and rule international play, with yearly world championships beginning in 1936. Since then, roller hockey has achieved popularity all around the globe. But roller hockey history in America hasn’t been one long breakaway. In fact, roller hockey’s attractiveness has fallen and risen. In 1991, roller hockey turned pro with the establishment of Roller Hockey International, which consists of teams around the U.S. complete with talented local amateurs and retired ice hockey professionals. 

Different high-profile exhibition games at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, particularly though it was called “rink hockey,” gave the sport real exposure. By 1994, the RHI league had 24 teams. Since then, sadly, leagues have dropped teams faster than pre-fight gloves. Presently, roller hockey is still vastly played on both inline and quad skates and has popularity from Africa to Europe to the Americas.

Roller hockey, as stated, has been an exhibition sport at the Olympics and enjoys global participation in the Roller Hockey World Cup, luring competitive teams from Italy, England, France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, and Argentina. Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Argentina are the major powers. 

Roller Hockey Defined (Part I)

Play hockey on roller skates.

Roller hockey is a type of floor hockey played on a dry field with roller skates. Roller Hockey can be two types, the difference is the type of sticks and skates that are used. The customary roller hockey, which can be said to be rink hockey or quad hockey, is played with quad stakes. The inline hockey is played with inline skates.

There is another sort of roller hockey which is called skater hockey, this is played on both inline and quad skates.

Inline hockey is played by two teams with five players each (four skaters and one goalie). It is done on a dry rink. The rink is split by two halves. There’s a line down the center and one net at each side of the rink. Inline hockey is played in three periods (13 minutes each). If the game is a top standard game, then the periods are 20 minutes.

What is Roller Hockey?

Roller hockey, also called “quad hockey,” “inline hockey,” or “skater hockey,” started as a warm-weather substitute for ice hockey lovers. Currently, the sport has numerous variations and has a zealous following in practically every corner of the world. Though it doesn’t have the long history of some sports, folks have been lacing up their roller skates, happy for a little fast-paced competition, for over 125 years.

Roller hockey and ice hockey were possibly an outgrowth of the time-honored bat and ball games of field hockey, shinty, and hurling, all widely popular through the UK. Ice hockey started in Montreal, Canada by English soldiers in the 1850s. By the 1870s, McGill University students, also living in the Montreal area, had structured a set of rules for gameplay. Ice hockey is thought to have been first played in the US in 1893.

What is Floor Hockey? 

You play floor hockey inside.

Floor hockey is an expression used to denote a collection of indoor hockey sports which were resulting from numerous hockey codes. Five typical variations of the sport exist, of which three are founded on ice hockey, and two are built on the field or bandy hockey.

Floor Hockey is a team sport, like ice hockey, but played on a flat floor surface. Like hockey, players on each team try to shoot a puck into a goal with a stick.

All variants of floor hockey are played on wooden surfaces like that of basketball courts. Various sorts of sticks and skates, and a puck or ball are used for dissimilar variations. For all variants of the sport, the aim stays the same. Teams have to move the puck or ball towards the opponent’s goal and score lots of goals within the game.

Though variations of floor hockey vary in the number of players per team and the period of matches, there are some fundamental rules that are customary for all variations:

  • Face-off is used at the beginning of every period and to start play after every goal is scored.
  • Overtime play and penalty shootouts are utilized to determine a winner if the game is tied at the end of regulation time.
  • Huge infractions result in the offending player remaining out for two minutes. Minor violations result in a free hit.

Floor hockey was created in 1962 in Battle Creek, Michigan. Rules and regulations were developed to help turn the game into a sport. Floor Hockey is a sport that is separated from the original sport of ice hockey.  It is thought to be a well-liked sport with its own rules regulated by the NHL. The National Hockey League was established in 1917. Now, floor hockey is a game that is played indoors, being played in numerous gym classes.

Nutrition for Hockey Players (Part II)

Practice and Game Day Nutrition Guidelines: Breakfast

A balanced nutritional diet will keep your hockey player in top condition on the ice.

Breakfast Ideas:

Idea #1

1 whole-grain bagel

Peanut butter or natural cheese

1 banana

1-2 cups milk

Idea #2

1 cup oatmeal with brown sugar or honey

½ cup blueberries or strawberries

1-2 cups milk

Idea #3

2-egg omelet

2 slices of whole-wheat toast with margarine

Fresh orange or pear

1-2 cups milk

Practice and Game Day Nutrition Guidelines: Lunch

Lunch Ideas:

Idea #1

Turkey Sandwich

2 slices whole-grain bread

Lower-sodium turkey slices

Mustard, tomato, and lettuce

1 cup baby carrots and 2 Tbsp dressing to dip

1 orange

1 to 2 cups of milk

2 chocolate chip cookies

 

Lunch 2

Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich

2 slices whole-wheat bread

Peanut butter

Jelly or jam

Salad with dressing

1 banana

Yogurt

1-2 cups milk

Practice and Game Day Nutrition Guidelines:1 Hour Prior to Exercise

Light snack or fluids before competition such as:

½ cup yogurt

1 cup milk

2 crackers and peanut butter

2 cups of water

Practice and Game Day Nutrition Guidelines: Post-Exercise

Drink: chocolate milk, 100% fruit juice or diluted juice, smoothie, drinkable yogurt.

Don’t forget water! Sip down until no longer thirsty and then have a little more.

If your hockey player wants to eat, try:

Fruit with cottage cheese or yogurt

Cereal with milk

Cheese and crackers

Peanut butter or cheese sandwich

Trail mix

 

Practice and Game Day Nutrition Guidelines: Post-Game/Practice Dinner

Meat and Alternatives: Lean meats, fish or alternatives such as tofu, legumes, tempeh.

Grain Products: Whole grain rice, pasta, bread, cereals, quinoa, bulgur, barley, and couscous.

Vegetables and Fruits: To maximize nutrients from vegetables, try to have at least two different colors of vegetables at dinner. Have at least one serving of fruit. Change fruits throughout the week to get increased variety.

Nutrition for Hockey Players (Part I)

A solid game-day performance requires more than just practice. Your young hockey player will do well all day long with these crucial nutrition guidelines for hockey practices and games.

Everyday Training Guidelines

Maintaining a healthy diet while playing hockey will allow you to perform the best on the ice.

Focus on snacks and meals to give your hockey players the supreme shot at doing their best and meeting their development and growth needs.

Fuel up on carbs: Carbohydrate-rich foods offer the best fuel for growing, working, and active bodies.

What they are: fruits, vegetables, whole-grain bread, whole-grain foods (such as brown rice), milk and legumes (peas, beans, and lentils). In addition to being a slow-release carbohydrate, legumes are a great source of protein. Use them in stews, soups, tortillas, and other dishes.

Get the right amount of protein: Eating enough, but not huge amounts of, protein during the day helps kids do well academically and athletically. Also, protein helps build and repair tissues and sustain a strong immune system. Though, avoid the enticement of high-protein diets.

They won’t help athletic kids do better. In fact, these diets might cut energy tremendously. This is because carbohydrates are the body’s top source of fuel. Additionally, a high-protein diet could be dehydrating. Stick to protein sources like meats, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, and tofu.

Some fat from healthy sources is needed to sustain good health. You can get healthy fats in canola oil, peanuts, and peanut butter, olive oil, walnuts, almonds, pecans, Brazil nuts, soy nuts, and fatty fish like salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, char, and trout.

Don’t forget fluids. You need them to support all body functions.

Active children must meet their energy demands not to mention their growth and development needs. To do this, they must have three nutritionally balanced meals and three to four healthy snacks during the day.

 

The Budget for Youth Hockey (Part III)

Pelvic protectors: $100 for four

Pants: $240 for five pairs

Shells: $40 for four

Undersocks: $100 for 10 pairs

Practice socks: $50 for five pairs

Bags: $200 for four bags

Oh, and the tape. How could we forget tape? Black (or white) for the stick blade, white (or black) for the stick handle, clear to wrap around the socks and keep the shin guards intact.

Black tape: $300

White tape: $50

Clear tape: $200

But each time you see your child dexterously and meticulously wrap the tape around his or her stick, you realize you’re getting your money’s worth. It’s close to passion.

Stick wax: $50

Then there are the big-ticket items: travel costs, including tournament fees, team dues, which include uniforms, coaching and the expensive ice time, summer camp tuitions, and a lesson or clinic fees. These cost changes from year to year, based on the number of tournaments and camps. Below is a rough, cringe-worthy estimate from the past few years.

Travel (transportation, lodging, meals): $10,500

Along with all the hockey gear, you have to factor in the travel expenses.

Club dues: $20,000

Camps, clinics, and lessons: $10,000

Overlooked here are the price attached to your vehicle, as well as things such as gas, repairs, and mileage. You might have to go through a few vehicles since you not only have to deal with mileage but also the wear and tear of those hockey bags. True fact: I racked up over 165, 000 miles in less than four years. My suggestion is to get a vehicle that can handle the hockey gear and traveling before your child starts his or her hockey career.

I’m leaving the car costs out since it’s quality bonding time with your young hockey player. You can talk about hockey, homework, music, the moon, friends, and the game, regardless if it was a victory or not.

 

The Budget for Youth Hockey (Part II)

Skates: $2,700

Hockey skates can be a little pricey but seeing their enjoyment on the ice is priceless.

Truthfully, most parents try not to think of the expense. When you look at the skates, and it’s not dollar signs you see, but the first time your youth hockey player tied them. As she waited to get on the ice before her 1st game, the best player on the team tapped your child on the helmet to get their attention, then smiled to let them know they were one of them.

Helmets: $1,250

Helmets? Players go through them not as often as other equipment. Sometimes they will keep wearing a helmet because it reminds them of a special occurrence.

Gloves: $400.

The nastiest aspect of hockey is the smelly gloves, which is why there is a cottage industry and most likely a branch of science dedicated to getting rid of the odor. You might not mind driving hours to games and practices through weather that would make “Ice Road Truckers” think twice.

The drive back while attempting not to breathe through your nose, though, is difficult. My child, the hockey player, informed me that she loved it. It reminded her of all the hard work and sweat she puts into stick-handling.

Sticks: $1,750.

Once a player moves from wood to hi-tech composite, sticks can be a big hockey expense, particularly if you get the latest $250 Zetterberg or Crosby from a retailer. There are places that sell customized sticks for around $150. The broken hockey sticks can be used to make sure any raccoons don’t pry the lids off your garbage cans.

Hockey parents frequently trade tips on where to purchase wholesale to try and reduce costs. But the truth be told, it still adds up:

Neck guards: $70 each

Shoulder pads: $270 each

Undershirts: $150 each

Practice jerseys: $100 each

 

The Budget for Youth Hockey (Part I)

They come in all shapes and sizes, from Washington state to Maine, Florida to Alaska. Yet, every youngster at the USA Hockey’s 2013 National Championships had one thing in common. Slung over every player’s shoulder was a big, bulky, and about to burst at the seams duffel bag.

That’s all in being a hockey player. You have to be carrying a 40-pound behemoth into and out of rinks while having two sticks in one hand and a drink in the other. The goalies have it worse. They have bigger pads and gloves, paddles, yet, nobody ever complains. Hockey teaches you to carry your load early on.

What is All That?

For the benefit of the uninitiated, every bag holds a helmet, skates, shin guards,

A child’s hockey experience can cost you a good chunk of change so make sure you’re saving up.

shoulder pads, a neck guard, elbow pads, protective pants or girdles, shells, home and away jerseys, home and away socks, (smelly) gloves, various undergarments, hosiery and plenty of tape, as well as sundry items including a blade sharpener, a rag, first aid kit, scissors, wax, talcum powder, and an iPod. Tack on another $170 for Apple AirPods.

Most youth hockey players have at least five pairs of Bauer skates priced at around $200 per pair. Just a bit of info: adult topline pairs go for over $500. If your child plays for both school and travel teams, she/he goes through two sets of blades a year, so additional steel can cost around $300.

Sharpening: $5 once a week for 25 weeks, times 10 years, costs $1,250. Include $50 for broken laces and lost blade covers. Then there’s $45 for any shoe repairs. This is a good time for you to learn by word of mouth for anyone who does shoe repairs. This stops your child from having to break in a new pair.

 

Famous Women Field Hockey Players (Part II)

Kayla Bashore-Smedley

These young ladies definitely made their impact on the sport of field hockey.

Kayla Bashore-Smedley was born in Daegu, South Korea and is a US field hockey defender and midfielder. Now residing in San Diego, California, she played field hockey for Indiana University. She was the first player from IU to make the US National Field Hockey team. She played for the USA at the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Emilie Sinia

Emilie Sinia is a Belgian field hockey player. She competed with the Belgium women’s national field hockey team in the women’s tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Stephanie de Groof

Stephanie De Groof is a field hockey player representing Belgium. She competed with the Belgium women’s national field hockey team in the women’s tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Lauren Crandall

Lauren Crandall is a US field hockey player. In the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Summer Olympics, she was a part of the United States women’s national field hockey team as well as being a team captain in 2012 and 2016. She played for the national team from 2005-2016. Before joining the national team, she played field hockey for Wake Forest, winning the NCAA field hockey championship twice.

Caroline Nichols

Caroline Nichols is a US field hockey player. She was a member of the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team and 2012 US Olympic team for Women’s Field Hockey.

Nichols played varsity field hockey on the Lady Monarchs for four years at Old Dominion. She was an Academic All-American and First String All-American as well as a member of the Colonial Athletic Association championship team in 2005.

In 2008, USA Field Hockey nominated Nichols to the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team.

Lola Danhaive

Lola Danhaive is a Belgian field hockey player. In the 2012 Summer Olympics, Danhaive was a part of the Belgium women’s national field hockey team in the women’s tournament.

 

Famous Women Field Hockey Players (Part I)

This list of famous women field hockey players contains the most well-known

Both Ellen Hoog and Nicola White have made major history in the sport of women’s field hockey.

and top females are known for being incredible field hockey players. There are hundreds of females performing as field hockey players around the globe, but this list highlights only the most prominent ones. Historic field hockey players have worked diligently to become the best that they can be. So, if you’re a female hoping to be a field hockey player then the ladies below should give you inspiration.

Ellen Hoog

Ellen Hoog is a Dutch female field hockey player as well as a member of the Netherlands women’s national field hockey team. Additionally, she is a member of the Amsterdamsche Hockey & Bandy Club. In 2004, she made her debut in the national team. She has played over 125 matches for the national team in which she has scored 32 goals. In 2005, she became European Champion in Dublin. Also, in 2005, she won the Champions Trophy in Canberra as part of the Dutch National Women’s Team. She was also on the Dutch team that became World Champion at the 2006 Women’s Hockey World Cup.

Nicola White

She was born in Shaw and Crompton and started playing hockey at the age of 7 at school and began her club hockey at Saddleworth HC. She is an English international field hockey player who plays as a forward for Great Britain and England. She plays club hockey in the Investec Women’s Hockey League Premier Division for Holcombe.

White won a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympic Games and a gold medal at the 2016 Olympic Games.

After beginning to play internationally in May 2009 for England, White won silver at the Champions Trophy and bronze medals at the World Cup, Commonwealth, and European competitions.