The Budget for Youth Hockey (Part II)

Skates: $2,700

Hockey skates can be a little pricey but seeing their enjoyment on the ice is priceless.

Truthfully, most parents try not to think of the expense. When you look at the skates, and it’s not dollar signs you see, but the first time your youth hockey player tied them. As she waited to get on the ice before her 1st game, the best player on the team tapped your child on the helmet to get their attention, then smiled to let them know they were one of them.

Helmets: $1,250

Helmets? Players go through them not as often as other equipment. Sometimes they will keep wearing a helmet because it reminds them of a special occurrence.

Gloves: $400.

The nastiest aspect of hockey is the smelly gloves, which is why there is a cottage industry and most likely a branch of science dedicated to getting rid of the odor. You might not mind driving hours to games and practices through weather that would make “Ice Road Truckers” think twice.

The drive back while attempting not to breathe through your nose, though, is difficult. My child, the hockey player, informed me that she loved it. It reminded her of all the hard work and sweat she puts into stick-handling.

Sticks: $1,750.

Once a player moves from wood to hi-tech composite, sticks can be a big hockey expense, particularly if you get the latest $250 Zetterberg or Crosby from a retailer. There are places that sell customized sticks for around $150. The broken hockey sticks can be used to make sure any raccoons don’t pry the lids off your garbage cans.

Hockey parents frequently trade tips on where to purchase wholesale to try and reduce costs. But the truth be told, it still adds up:

Neck guards: $70 each

Shoulder pads: $270 each

Undershirts: $150 each

Practice jerseys: $100 each