To Every Annoying Hockey Player Parent

You know who you are. You’re the one who knows everything, yet adds nothing.  You are the one who finds something wrong with everything, the coach, the players, the team as a whole. I am embarrassed that you wear the same logo as my son because your actions aren’t what I want being part of a sports team to teach him.

You probably don’t know this, but I stand off to the side for a reason. When the season is in full swing, the coach, who happens to be my husband, has to make decisions to give the team an advantage. It makes you mad when your son isn’t the center of attention. You need to ask yourself: are you here so your son can be a team member or you want personal glory?

I just want to know because we (parents and players) are here to play on a sports team. If personal glory is your goal, you might want to play tennis or golf?

The coach is the individual who makes decisions about this group, creating the best combinations of players. He isn’t here to put you and your son on display. Yes, your son is talented, but so is ever other child on the team, in one way or another.

My husband, the coach, spends his night coming up with exercises to help the weakest link on the team build up the self-confidence needed to contribute to the team. If I were a guessing woman, I would say that it’s the same child you bad mouth on your way home in your car.

And oh by the way, that child can hear what you are yelling out about him from the stands. With every negative, condescending thing you say, the coach (my husband) has to work a little harder to build back up the child’s confidence so he can play the game.

It’s sad that I need to remind you that these are children we are talking about.

Raising A Girl Hockey Player

My son was playing hockey at 5. Sometimes, he has a girl on his team.  In one instance during a game, he got hit by a girl hockey player so hard he grew a whole new perspective on what playing like a girl signifies. Now with a daughter who plays hockey, I feel like I am floating in muddy waters.

My daughter, who is 4, eagerly straps on her skates so she can begin playing. I don’t worry one bit.

However, every since she began hockey, it is clear that having a daughter who plays hockey is quite different than a son. But over the past two years, I’ve noticed that having a girl who plays hockey is a lot different than having a boy.

What is a Jill? I believed a jock strap had a specific job.  I didn’t know a girl needed a Jill.  And, that’s just for starters. Trying to get a pony tail in a helmet accurately is a work of art. The more my daughter’s love for hockey grows, the more I’m confused. I needed some guidance and got some from a fellow daughter hockey playing mother. I had a talk with her daughter and this is what she told me:

The biggest thing about playing hockey that made me who I am today is that hockey made me be physically and mentally tough. The difference between girls’ and guys’ hockey is when you watch a guys’ game, it seems like you’re watching boxing. Girl hockey games are more skillful. It’s about commanding the puck instead of fighting. But don’t be fooled. Just because girls aren’t supposed to check, doesn’t mean they won’t. They just make it difficult caught. One of the best things about hockey is to let your anger go while getting a good workout in. Girls can be just as physical as boys.